Three Bs for a Beautiful Brand

Letter BMy sister’s a graphic designer, just like me. In fact she inspired me most to start my own small business, she’s a wonderful mentor, younger than me, but so much wiser!

Last week she put a post on facebook about a new client who had come to her for a quote for a website – that’s fairly normal in our profession – but when she delved deeper (well, not that deep really) it became apparent that this client didn’t have a business yet, nor a business name, she didn’t have products or clients and wasn’t sure what a blog was. She just had an idea. Needless to say this makes a designer’s job very difficult. So my sister stated that before a client comes to her for a quote, they need to have the three B’s (at least). I agree. Here they are:

A Business – one can’t sell or serve without an actual business. This means having a business name, trade marking that name or logo, registering the name, and buying a domain. I didn’t say it was quick and easy, but having these things in place before you go getting websites and business cards is important. This is the foundation stuff. There’s a lot more to it on an emotional level too, but I’ll save that for another day.

A Brief – we designers like to know as much as possible about your business. Not only do we make things look pretty, we also need to know things like who your target market is; including their gender, age and profession, what your product or service is, how you plan to reach your market, what makes you different to everyone else doing a similar thing. A design brief should contain all of that information as well as things like the colours you want to use and why, the style of your business (corporate, spiritual, alternative, healthy etc) and the moods you want to convey through your branding. I know!! We’re nosy people us designers, but in the end you’ll get a design that’s created specifically for your business, not some random generic logo you got online for five bucks that Bob over the road could use.

A Budget – You need to know how much money you can commit to your design project because us designers can generally tailor a package to suit or offer payment plans. Lots of people shy away from talking about money but it’s important to get that sorted from the start. Then there are no nasty surprises and everyone’s happy. I generally give a fixed price quote because that’s what I prefer myself. Hourly rates are too varied and it can blow out really fast, so a fixed price is much better for you – often not so good for me, as design work is incredibly time consuming and can go on and on – but them’s the breaks.

So, if you’re thinking about a website or a logo, answer the above questions first and you’ll be off with a flying start. I’m more than happy to have a chat if you want to know more and would love your comments below.